Athena Institute Investigations

Magyar

The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army / Hunnia Movement

  • Original name: Magyarok Nyilai Nemzeti Felszabadító Hadsereg / Hunnia Mozgalom
  • Year of formation: 2007
  • Presumed No. of members: 17
  • Presumed seat: Budapest
  • Presumed leader(s): György Budaházy (m)
  • Ideology: racist extremism, anti-Semitism, anti-gay, Hungarian supremacism
  • Threat level: 6
  • Active/Inactive: Inactive


Last updated: 17. 05. 2013.

According to the conclusions of the investigation carried out by the Prosecution Service and closed in 2010, the “Hunnia Movement” – established in 2007 by extreme right leaders György Budaházy and László Toroczkai – was behind the “Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army”, against which various terrorism-related charges were filed. The charges suggest that the extremist group is responsible for a number of actions against Hungarian politicians, public figures, and against the Hungarian Roma, Jewish, and LGBT communities, designed to cause fear.

In early May, 2013, József Ináncsi, leader of the Hungarian National Guard, and other guard members gave an interview to György Budaházy, ex-leader of the now defunct Arrows of the Hungarians extremist group.

In early May, 2013, Márton Gyöngyösi, MP of a parliamentary party, gave an interview to György Budaházy, ex-leader of the now defunct Arrows of the Hungarians extremist group.

In late February, 2013, a parliamentary party’s two MEPs (Krisztina Morvai and Tamás Gaudi-Nagy) interviewed György Budaházy, ex-leader of the now defunct Arrows of the Hungarians extremist group, in which they portray Budaházy as a hero and a victim.

In mid-February, 2013, a parliamentary party’s two MEPs (Krisztina Morvai, Tamás Gaudi-Nagy) were the guests in the radio show of György Budaházy. Budaházy, the former leader of the disbanded and now defunct Arrows of the Hungarians extremist group, is still under prosecution for terrorism, amongst other charges.

In mid-December 2012, the Hungarian National Guard, together with other extremist groups, György Budaházy, ex-leader of the now defunct Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army, and an MP who used to be a member of a parliamentary party carried out a propaganda action in Budapest.

At the beginning of October 2012, György Budaházy, ex-leader of the now defunct The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberation Amy, who is still under home detention due to terrorism charges, interviewed Zsolt Tyirityán, the leader of the Outlaws’ Army extremist group. During the interview the two extremists agreed that racial war is nigh both in Europe and in Hungary. In Hungary it will be inevitable because we “overbred the Gypsies”, who have “a genetic code that cannot be changed”. Hence, according to Tyirityán, “even though we cannot annihilate them”, an “apartheid system should be put into place”, since “The Gypsy have no place in the lebensraum of the Hungarians”.
The leader of the Outlaws’ Army also said that they organise self-defence trainings for young people. Such a training is already going on at Gyula, but they are planning on launching more in Budapest and Eger.
 

At the end of September 2012, the Hungarian Court relaxed the provisions taken against György Budaházy, from house arrest to home detention.

At the beginning of September, 2012, László Toroczkai, leader of the Sixty-four Counties Youth Movement, gave an interview to György Budaházy, in which they depicted the societal situation between the Hungarian Roma community and the not-Roma as a racial/ethnic conflict that is becoming stronger and more and more violent.

At the beginning of July, 2012, the Kőszegi Klub held a propaganda film screening where they commemorated the „battle of Elizabeth Bridge” that was led by the ex-leader of the now inactive The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army, György Budaházy.

At the end of June, 2012, the Metropolitan Court of Budapest acquitted György Budaházy, the ex-leader of the now defunct domestic extremist group Arrows of the Hungarians’ - National Liberating Army who was charged with ‘preparation to forcefully change the constitutional order’. This acquittal does not affect all other undergoing prosecutions against Budaházy that involve charges of terrorism.

At the end of May, 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement, accused of several terrorism related charges was fined for impairment of the Soviet monument in 2006. The review of the former verdict was declined and the decision became a legally binding verdict.

At the end of May, 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement, accused of several terrorism related charges held a lecture via skype in New York. 

At the end of April, 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement, accused of several terrorism related charges held a lecture via skype in Veszprém.

Mid-April, 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement, accused of several terrorism related charges and a representative of a parliamentary party are to hold a lecture together in Budapest titled „Law protection in Hungary”. 

Mid-April, 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement accused of several charges including terrorism held a lecture via skype in Pécs. The event was organized by the Sixty-four County Youth Movement.

Mid-March, 2012, to confront a demonstration held in Budapest for the Hungarian press freedom a counterprotest is organized by an unidentified extremist group. According to unconfirmed sources György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement accused of several terrorism related charges, Zsolt Tyirityán, leader of the Outlaws' Army and László Toroczkai, leader of the Sixty-four County Youth Movement also joined to the counterprotest.

Mid-January, 2012 György Budaházy, the leader of Hunnia movement accused of several terrorism-related charges joined the World Alliance of Hungarians.

Mid-January 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia Movement accused by Hungarian authorities with several charges including terrorism, sent an open letter to the Hungarian Telegraph Agency, which was publicized by the kuruc.info extremist group. Budaházy expressed in his letter that „I have recognized it several times for years, that the Hungarian Telegraph Agency regularly tries to represent me in a negative context in its news related to me”.

Mid-January, 2012, the Metropolitan Court of Budapest carried on the criminal trial against György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia Movement, accused of several terrorism related charges. The hearing was held behind closed doors as proposed by the prosecutor who referred to the protection of the witness. The audience, György Budaházy, and his accused companion were also excluded from the hearing.

Mid-January, 2012, György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia movement accused of several terrorism-related charges, was interrogated as a suspect by National Police. According to the charges, Budaházy and László Toroczkai, the leader of the Sixty-four County Youth Movement incited hatred against the LGBT community in a radio program aired in 2008. After being questioned, György Budaházy was released back to house arrest. The Pax Hungarica and kuruc.info extremist groups issued statements about the case.

Early January, 2012, the New Hugarian Guard extremist group and György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia Movement accused with several terrorism-related charges, joined the hostile campaign against democratic parliamentary parties and some civil associations in front of the Hungarian State Opera. The Athena Institute assessed the incident in an Incident Report.

Based on the investigation of the Prosecution Service, closed in the fall of 2010, some of the terrorist acts in Hungary between 2007 and 2009 were in fact carried out by the members of the “Hunnia Movement”, who were using the “The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army” as a pseudonym in the media. According to the investigation files, the “Hunnia Movement” – the background organization of the “The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army” – was founded in the spring of 2007, on the “Day of Inception”, by two well-known far-right extremists, György Budaházy and László Toroczkai. Their intention was to create a “shadow state” within Hungary which would eventually have been able to seize power from the legitimately elected government. The founders then attempted to have the organization officially registered, which was rejected by the Court.

In 2008 people in ski masks and uniforms in traditional costumes were proclaiming a “Raid on corruption”. György Budaházy and László Toroczkai made it clear in their announcement that “corrupt, traitor politicians will be hunted down, but the raid will also be extended to Police officers, officers of the Customs and Finance Guard, secret agents, employees of the Hungarian tax authority, journalists, prosecutors, judges, and other officials, who are paid from tax-payers money and abuse their positions”. The aim of this – apart from causing fear – was to “hold those public servants accountable” whom they considered guilty.

Based on the allegations of the Prosecution Service, between 2007 and 2008 the hate group – using the name “The Arrows of Hungarians” – carried out Molotov-cocktail attacks against real estates owned by 10 known politicians.
Apart from the private real estates, the list of targets attacked by the hate group also included the offices of a parliamentary party in the country-side. According to the charges the aim of the attacks was to intimidate the politicians of the governing parties and to influence parliamentary decision-making. Consequently these acts qualify as attempts to change the current constitutional system by violent means.

The “Arrows of the Hungarians” has claimed responsibility for several violent crimes. Apart from politically-motivated deterrence, several clubs frequented by the Hungarian LGBT community were firebombed. With these the hate group intended to intimidate members of the community and to prevent the yearly Gay Pride rally.

The assault on Sándor Csintalan, a known Hungarian public figure in 2008 can be considered as the bloodiest act carried out by the hate group so far. The former Member of Parliament and TV anchor was attacked and gravely assaulted in his garage by four men wearing black ski masks. Based on the public figure's account the attackers, while they were beating him up with a loaded cane, called him a “Jewish henchman” several times during the incident.

In the case of the Molotov cocktail attack against the Broadway Ticket Office in Budapest, the client intending to buy tickets for a “national rock concert”, and the shop assistant give irreconcilable accounts. According to the client the conflict started when he/she was refused assistance, was called "a fascist" and “was dragged by the arm from the Office” to the street. In contrast to this, the shop assistant says that the client called him/her "a Jew" and made other vindictive remarks. The hate group almost immediately claimed responsibility for the subsequent firebomb attack against the Ticket Office. In the letter sent to the authorities the hate group states that the aim of the attack was to intimidate “anti-Hungarian groups” and to retaliate for the acts of “traitors”. The incident triggered a series of demonstrations and counter-demonstrations.

According to the indictment filed by the Prosecution Service, the members of the hate group – following György Budaházy's instructions – in 2009 intended to detonate explosive devices camouflaged as footballs near the houses of three Members of Parliament. The attempt was thwarted by the intervention of the National Bureau of Investigation, during which the perpetrators were apprehended.

The head of the hate group is accused of terrorist acts, instigation to aggravated assault, while most of his associates are accused of terrorist acts and aggravated assault by the Prosecution Service. In its announcement, the Prosecution Service stated that “in the Hungarian legal environment the crimes committed by György Budaházy and his associates qualify as acts of terrorism carried out in criminal association.” According to the relevant legislation, it is considered an act of terrorism when a group is formed in order to influence the operation of state bodies through acts of violence and to use weapons to reach goals.

In light of the information uncovered by the Police so far, the acts of intimidation were led by György Budaházy, the head of the Military command of the Arrows of the Hungarians. The hate group was presumably comprised of independent “cells”. The members of the group did not know each other and this made the investigation more difficult. 

In March, 2011 the Metropolitan Court of Budapest started the criminal trial of the The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army (Hunnia Movement). During the June 9 day of the trial a witness – who by his own account was member of the movement before - gave evidence against the leader of the hate group. In line with the indictment he announced that trainings during which the members practiced Molotov cocktail attacks were conducted by György Budaházy, leader of the extremist group, and he gave instructions to commit crimes written in the indictment. By threatening the parliamentary parties and their sympathizers the extremist group aspired to influence on the political decision making. Witness in his testimony also mentioned that László Toroczkai, current leader of a “youth movement”, that contains extremist elements, as well attended the recruitment activities.

“Hunnia has reborn on the streets of Budapest. It also became clear that the National Police won’t be our allied. So, we have to defeat them.” – According to László Toroczkai, a leader of the the Outlaws’ Army and Hunnia Movement, an organization whose members are charged with committing multiple terrorist attacks, the extremist campaign against the Budapest Pride was a clear success. National Police, blocking any attempt of possible physical attacks against the Budapest Pride Parade, separated demonstrators from far-right extremist protesters. László Toroczkai called members of participating extremist organizations for initiating a law suit against the Hungarian State asking for compensation because “nearly a thousand people were closed illegally at the square of Oktogon”. According to his statement the amount resulting from a possible favorable ruling will provide financial assistance to extremist organizations he oversees and to György Budaházy who is charged with committing terror attacks.

Late September, 2011, the Metropolitan Court of Budapest terminated the detention of György Budaházy, leader of the Hunnia Movement, who is charged with several accounts of terrorism. The extremist leader will remain in house arrest. The presiding judge claimed that while both previous reasons of detention - the possibility of escape and repeating crimes - remain valid, still the suspect was held in custody for too long without a ruling.

György Budaházy, after being transferred to house arrest, sided with the Outlaw’s Army in an interview in early October, 2011. The extremist leader claimed that “Tyirityan’s criminal record stems from the fact that they [the Outlaw’s Army] are fighting these Gypsies in the countryside. After this it is hypocrisy from Jobbik to speak about their criminal record patronizingly. What’s next? I will also be discomforting for them? [...] This is awkward. [...] I have good memories of Novák. [...] Now, that I was imprisoned, he could have done a bit more. Sadly, the kuruc.info [...] is not the same as it has been. It lost the fire, it had before.”

György Budaházy, accused by Hungarian authorities with several charges including terrorism, was released from prison in September, 2011. Late October, the kuruc.info group published a propaganda piece written by Budaházy that “argues” for the establishment of a “Gypsy country” and the forced expulsion of all Roma Hungarians there. It is noteworthy that the propaganda article is framed to make an impression that it is part of a legitimate/mainstream political discourse - while it simply revive the worst policies of the XX. century (forced expulsion, “population swaps”, etc). The racist extremist propaganda reverberated through the far-right scene: the “article” was republished - and to some extent rejected - by other organized groups, like the National Front.

Mid-December, 2011 György Budaházy, a leading extremist figure accused by Hungarian authorities with several charges including terrorism, launched a new, internet-based radio programme. Budaházy interviewed two persons who participated in the attack against the Hungarian National Television during the 2006 riots.

"The flames seen Friday morning should remind all the traitors where the »No button« is.
The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army”

(The declaration admitting the organization's participation in the Molotov cocktail attacks against Hungarian Members of Parliament, 2008.)

„Recognizing the fact that the current system cannot be changed from within, instead of useless activities (collecting signatures, referendums, demonstrations) we are going to use a method hitherto unprecedented in Hungarian history, (and comparable only to the passive resistance of the 19th century and the Irish struggle for independence): we will rebuild and restore Hungary as it once was [...]”

(Founders of the Hunnia movement, 2007.)

„Politicians have already been warned. »Red Csepel« and the »Broadway« should teach a lesson to the civilian sector: anti-Hungarian sentiments and treason will be retaliated.
The Arrows of the Hungarians National Liberating Army”

(The Declaration claiming responsibility for the attack against the Broadway ticket office in Budapest, 2008.)