Athena Institute

Magyar

Celebrating Norway - A Partnership

2012-01-10
By monitoring and analyzing domestic extremism, the Athena Institute works towards understanding and tackling the phenomena that threatens both the democratic political process and human lives in the European continent - and it is proud to be a partner of Norway in finding solutions to transform not just our policies, but our political culture to counter the most harmful tendencies and foster human dignity and security.

The Athena Institute is proud of its partnership with Norway that dates back to the first days of the establishment of the the Institute.

Early December, 2010, the Institute was glad to announce the start of collaboration when Norway’s Ambassador to Budapest, H.E. Siri Ellen Sletner endorsed the Institute’s efforts and agreed to assist the new institution to develop ties with Norwegian counterparts.

In the spring of 2011, another step was made as the Athena Institute was awarded by a grant from the Norwegian Government to support its activities. That time, Ambassador Sletner stated that ‘by supporting the Institute, the Embassy wishes to declare the commitment of the Government of the Kingdom of Norway towards securing human rights and dignity and protection of vulnerable groups.’

After the tragic events of July 22, the Institute was introduced to the Norwegian public by the Dagens Næringsliv, the largest national business newspaper published in Oslo that in a detailed article on domestic extremism reflected on Hungarian experiences and challenges both countries are face.

By the end of the year, LO Stat, one of the key Norwegian confederations of trade unions, was holding its annual conference, a high-profile meeting of the country’s political and economic decision-makers. A keynote speaker of the event, Mr. Raymond Johansen, the Party Secretary of Norway’s governing Labor Party, dedicated his speech to address the most important issues the country has to face after the twin terror attacks. In his remarks, addressing key aspects of the threat posed by domestic extremism, Mr. Johansen cited findings of the Athena Institute to describe linkages connecting hate speech that can lead to forming a ‘culture of hate’ and terror acts carried out by domestic extremists.

By monitoring and analyzing domestic extremism, the Athena Institute works towards understanding and tackling the phenomena that threatens both the democratic political process and human lives in the European continent - and it is proud to be a partner of Norway in finding solutions to transform not just our policies, but our political culture in more profound ways to counter the most harmful tendencies and foster human dignity and security.